Here’s a Quick Way to Connect RS232 Equipment

Most programmable controllers will come with a RS232 communication port. This recommended standard (RS) has voltage signals in the range between 3 to 15 volts DC with respect to the ground/common pin. RS232 devices are classed either DTE (data terminal equipment) or DCE (data communication equipment).
The maximum cable length for the communication cable is 15m, however depending on the environment I have seen this as much as 50m without an issue.
Most RS232 connectors are 9 pin like the diagram below, but they can also come in 25 pin or RJ45 connectors.

 

A minimum 3 wire RS232 connection consists of only the transmit data, receive data and ground. This is commonly used if full handshaking is not required.

Pin 2 RD ————————– Pin 3 TD
Pin 3 TD ————————– Pin 2 RD
Pin 5 Ground ———————- Pin 5 Ground
Pin 7 RTS                                       Pin 8 CTS
Pin 8 CTS                                       Pin 7 RTS
Cable Shield

Note: I always jump Pin 4 and 6 out together on each side.
The shield on the connection cable should only be connect to one housing when making the cable. I usually connect it on the PLC end.

5 wire RS232 connection consists of the  transmit data, receive data, ground, request to send (RTS), clear to send (CTS)

Pin 2 RD ————————– Pin 3 TD
Pin 3 TD ————————– Pin 2 RD
Pin 5 Ground ———————- Pin 5 Ground
Pin 7 RTS  ———————— Pin 8 CTS
Pin 8 CTS  ———————— Pin 7 RTS
Cable Shield

Note: The shield on the connection cable should only be connect to one housing when making the cable. I usually connect it on the PLC end.

RS232 is a one to one communication method. (1:1) This means it is designed to communicate to one device. If multiple devices are needed,(1:N) RS422 or RS485 should be used by way of converters.
RS232 must have the same settings on each end. (Port Settings)
These include the following parameters:
Bits per second:  9600 (Baud Rate)
Data Bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop Bits: 1
Flow Control: None

If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



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