Tag Archives: plc input wiring diagram

Create an Analog Voltage Input Tester for a PLC

We will create a simple and inexpensive analog voltage tester for a PLC using a potentiometer and a 9VDC battery. The potentiometer will be 5K ohms. This should be enough impedance for most analog inputs of the programmable logic controller. (PLC) Voltage impedance for analog voltage inputs are in the mega ohm range where current input is typically 250 ohms. Our tester will be for analog voltage inputs (0-10 VDC). Check your input specifications before wiring anything to your PLC. I have used this tester for other voltage inputs along with a meter to ensure that the voltage levels do not get out of range for the input signal.
Analog inputs to the PLC are continuous and can come in a variety of signals. These signals can come from temperature, flow rate, pressure, distance, etc. Continue Reading!

Wiring Interposing Relays

Interposing relay means a device that will separate two different circuits. The isolation can be for current consumption, voltage differences, voltage references or a combination of both current and voltage. We can use these relays to help connect our inputs and outputs on our programmable logic controller. (PLC) Continue Reading!

Here’s a Quick Way to Wire NPN and PNP devices

Here’s a Quick Way to Wire NPN and PNP devices

I get asked often on how to wire NPN and PNP devices to the programmable logic controller. This can be confusing at first when looking at the wiring diagrams. I have managed to destroy a few sensors in the process….. so lets get started and I will share my experiences.

E2A_7069B_7l E2A_7002A_7l
NPN and PNP refer to the transistor in the output device.
NPN – Negative Positive Negative Switching. Sometimes referred to as ‘Sinking’ the load.  People have told me that when the NPN sensor blows it has a tendency to blow in an open state. (No Signal)
PNP – Positive Negative Positive Switching. Sometimes referred to as ‘Sourcing’ the load. People have told me that when the PNP sensor blows it has a tendency to blow in a closed state. (Signal On)

When the sensor blows, (malfunctions) it usually will also take out the power supply. (Fuse) It generally does not matter if you use NPN or PNP sensors provided they are all connected to the PLC using isolated commons.

You cannot mix PNP and NPN sensors on the same common point for inputs to the PLC. If you do mix the sensors, then the different common points on the PLC must be isolated from each other. This means that the commons are not connected internally to each other. Not ensuring this takes place will provide a short across the power supply and blow your sensors and supply. In general, machines tend to use all NPN or all PNP only.

Colour coding of the wires vary. Do not always rely on the colour code of the wires for connection. Refer to the wire diagrams in the documentation.

The following is a wire diagram of an open collector PNP sensor. You will notice that the load appears between the 0V (Blue)  and Switching wire (Black). When connecting to the PLC, the PLC input acts as the load. The 0V (Blue) will be attached to the common input and the Switching wire (Black) will be attached to the input number.PNP1

The following is a wire diagram of an open collector NPN sensor. You will notice that the load appears between the +V (Brown)  and Switching wire (Black). When connecting to the PLC, the PLC input acts as the load. The +V (Brown) will be attached to the common input and the Switching wire (Black) will be attached to the input number.NPN1

As you can see a direct short will be created if NPN and PNP sensors are wired into the PLC on the same common. The following shows an example of wiring of the 3 wire sensors into a PLC with isolated commons.

NPN_PNP_PLC

Watch on YouTube : Wiring NPN Sensor to PLC

Watch on YouTube : Wiring PNP Sensor to PLC

Watch on YouTube : Wiring Contact (Discrete) PLC Inputs

Wiring Interposing Relays
Watch on YouTube
: Wiring NPN and PNP Sensors into the PLC with an Interposing Relay
If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



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