Tag Archives: plc programming examples and solutions

Horner XL4 System Hardware

The Horner XL4 OCS is an All-in-one controller. This means that this modern unit combines a logic controller, operator interface, I/O and networking all into one package. This OCS (Operator Control Station) family was first released in 1998. New features to the line-up have been added over the years. Today the OCS family has a very competitive advantage as you will soon see.
Programming is done with a single programming software package. Cscape (Control Station Central Application Programming Environment) is designed to be easy to use and maintain.

This series on the Horner XL4 all-in-one controller (PLC) will go step by step through learning how to use this innovative unit. Continue Reading…

Understanding the PLC Program Scan

Understanding how the PLC will scan and update your program is critical in programming and troubleshooting your system. Typically a PLC will solve your logic from left to right, top to bottom. The status of the memory from the previous rung, are available for the next rung to use. We will look at a few examples to determine how the PLC will solve logic to illustrate the above program scanning.  Keep on Reading!

Excel Conditional Movement of Data

I have been recently asked how you can move data conditionally on an excel spreadsheet once the information has been obtained from the PLC? Monthly data was being collected from the PLC and put on an excel spreadsheet using Omron CX-Server DDE. They wanted at the beginning of each month to move the data to the appropriate month so they can track the changes.

The following three blogs were posted on how to get data into the Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet from the programmable logic controller. (PLC)

HOW TO IMPLEMENT MODBUS TCP PROTOCOL USING VBA WITH EXCEL

IMPLEMENTING THE OMRON CX SERVER DDE AND EXCEL

HOW TO IMPLEMENT THE OMRON HOST LINK PROTOCOL PART 2 – VBA

The method to move the data around the spreadsheet once the data has been obtained will be done by Visual Basic for Applications. (VBA)

Make a spreadsheet in excel as follows:
Excel Conditional Movement of Data 0100-min

Operation:
When the current data in A2 or B2 changes, it will trigger a macro to execute. This macro will use the Worksheet_Change to trigger the code. The date in A2 is then compared to all of the dates located from A5 to A30. If a match is found then the value in B2 is placed beside the matching date found column. Example: A2 = A7 then B7 = B2
Here is a look at the VBA editor and code:
Excel Conditional Movement of Data 0110-min

Here is the following code:
Private Sub Worksheet_Change(ByVal Target As Range)
If Target.Address = “$A$2” Or Target.Address = “$B$2” Then
For x = 5 To 30
If Sheets(“Sheet1”).Range(“A2”) = Sheets(“Sheet1”).Range(“A” & x) Then
Sheets(“Sheet1”).Range(“B” & x) = Sheets(“Sheet1”).Range(“B2”)
End If
Next ‘x
End If
End Sub

Download the example excel file.

Watch on YouTube : Excel Conditional Movement of Data
If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.

Building a PLC Program That You Can Be Proud Of – Part 5

The Game of Simon
Learning all about bit manipulation and sequencers

Simon is a memory game introduced in 1978. It has four coloured buttons, each producing a particular tone when it is pressed or activated by the device. A round in the game consists of the device lighting up one or more buttons in a random order, after which the player must reproduce that order by pressing the buttons. As the game progresses, the number of buttons to be pressed increases. If the wrong button is hit the current game is over. Our game will have a high level score and a current level score.

We will be using AdvancedHMI to communicate Modbus TCP to the Automation Direct Do-More Designer Software Simulator.

Watch on YouTube : The Game of Simon Play (PLC / HMI)
Here is the end result of our program.

Note: The programs are provided free of charge and are an excellent way to learn PLC / HMI programming.

Here is a quick review of the programming series so far. If you are new to the site, we recommend reviewing the other parts in the series first. In part 1 we looked at writing PLC programs to control a traffic light using discrete bits and then using timed sequencing using indirect addressing. Part 2 used indirect addressing for inputs as well as output to control the sequence of pneumatic (air) cylinders in the program. Part 3 and 4 we returned to the traffic light application and expand our program significantly. We looked at the sequence of operation using Input, output and mask tables.

Simon Game HMI 130-min

The first thing that we will do is look at the HMI programming. Please refer to the following post for information on setting up and using AdvancedHMI software.
Create a PLC with HMI Training and Learning Environment Free

The following table is the Modbus TCP memory map to the Do-More PLC:

Coil/Register Numbers Data Addresses Type Do-More PLC Table Name
00001-09999 0000 to 270E Read-Write MC1 to MC1023 Discrete Output Coils
10001-19999 0000 to 270E Read-Only MI1 to MI1023 Discrete Input Contacts
30001-39999 0000 to 270E Read-Only MIR1 to MIR2047 Analog Input Registers
40001-49999 0000 to 270E Read-Write MHR1 to MHR2047 Analog Output Holding Registers

Simon Game HMI 100-min
Add the ModbusTCPCom control and set the IP Address. Also set the PollRateOverride to 50 so the response to our PLC is quicker.

The following map will apply to our game:
(Communication between the HMI and PLC)

40002 – MHR2 – Register – Game Sounds
40001 – MHR1 – Register – Current Game Level
40003 – MHR3 – Register – Highest Game Level
00005 – MC5 – Bit – Start/Reset Game
00001 – MC1 – Bit – Green Button Input
10001 – MI1 – Bit – Green Button Set
00002 – MC1 – Bit – Red Button Input
10002 – MI1 – Bit – Red Button Set
00003 – MC1 – Bit – Yellow Button Input
10003 – MI1 – Bit – Yellow Button Set
00004 – MC1 – Bit – Blue Button Input
10004 – MI1 – Bit – Blue Button Set

Simon Game HMI 110-min
The DataSubsciber is used to read information from the PLC and manipulate the data in the visual basic code.  We will use this to determine what sounds to play.

The following is the code for the button when hit to play the sound and the DataSubscriber1 to play the sound when the playback from the PLC is required. (Console.Beep (Frequncy (Hz), Duration (msec)))

Private Sub PilotLight1_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles PilotLight1.Click ‘ Green Light
     Console.Beep(415, 420)
End Sub

Private Sub PilotLight2_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles PilotLight2.Click ‘ Red Light
     Console.Beep(310, 420)
End Sub

Private Sub PilotLight3_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles PilotLight3.Click ‘ Yellow Light
     Console.Beep(252, 420)
End Sub

Private Sub PilotLight4_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles PilotLight4.Click ‘ Blue Light
     Console.Beep(209, 420)
End Sub

Private Sub DataSubscriber1_DataChanged(sender As Object, e As Drivers.Common.PlcComEventArgs) Handles DataSubscriber1.DataChanged
If DataSubscriber1.Value = “1” Then
     Console.Beep(415, 420) ‘ Green
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “2” Then
     Console.Beep(310, 420) ‘ Red
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “4” Then
     Console.Beep(252, 420) ‘ Yellow
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “8” Then
     Console.Beep(209, 420) ‘ Blue
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “10” Then
     Console.Beep(120, 1500) ‘ Losing Sound
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “20” Then
     For x = 1 To 8
          Console.Beep(600, 90) ‘ Winning Sound
          Threading.Thread.Sleep(20)
     Next ‘x
End If
End Sub

Simon Game HMI 120-min

We now have our HMI interface complete and can move onto the PLC programming.

Random sequence generator – MHR4
The first four bits of MHR4 will be used to generate the random sequence for each step of the pattern.
The first scan is to set (1) a bit in MHR0. This will also ensure that the rest of the bits in the word are reset (0).
The second rung will shift the bits left in the output word MHR0. This will happen once per scan of the PLC. When bit 04 turns on then bit 00 will then be turned on again. This way we will always have one of the first four bits turned on in the output word. (00, 01, 02 or 03) MHR0 is logically AND with Hex value 000F and the result is placed in MHR4.

Simon Game PLC 100-min

Start the Game
The game will be started n the leading edge of the reset button. (MC5)
All of the registers and pointers are reset to start the game.
1     is moved into the current level – MHR1
100 is moved into the Play Sequence Pointer – V1
100 is moved into the Input Sequence Pointer – V2
100 is moved into the Current Level Pointer – V0
The random sequence MHR5 is moved indirectly into the Current Level Pointer V0 and this pointer is then incremented by 1.
An initialization bit is then set.

Simon Game PLC 110-min

The initialization bit starts a timer for 600msec in order to give time for the HMI to respond. Once the time expires the Initialization bit is reset and the game start bit is set. (Y0)
Y0 – Game Started is used to determine if play is to continue.

Simon Game PLC 120-min

Play the Sequence

Simon Game PLC 130-min

Set the outputs to play the sequence.
This will also set the sound to play for each of the colours selected. (MHR2)

Simon Game PLC 140-min

Reset the sound during the playing of the sequence.

Simon Game PLC 150-min

Read the inputs from the HMI. (MC1 – MC4)
Set the bits in V501 so we can compare the word.

Simon Game PLC 160-min

If the wrong button is hit, then play a sound and stop the game.

Simon Game PLC 170-min

If the correct color is selected, increment to the next random colour in the sequence.

Simon Game PLC 180-min

If the correct colour sequence has been entered, then the level has been completed.
Start a delay to ensure that the HMI has finished playing all of the sounds.

Simon Game PLC 190-min

When the level is entered correctly and the time delay has expired, we will reset the play and input pointers. The level increases by 1 and  another random number is added to the sequence and the current level pointer is incremented by 1.
MHR1 – Level – Increases
V1 – 100
V2 – 100
V0 – New random number gets indirecly addressed and the pointer is incremented by 1

Simon Game PLC 200-min

Setting the Highest Level achieved
If the current level is greater than the highest level, the current level is moved into the highest level.

Simon Game PLC 210-min

If no key is hit for 45 seconds after the sequence is played a sound will be played and the game start bit will be reset.

Simon Game PLC 220-min

If the game start bit is off for more than 500ms, the sound will be reset.

Simon Game PLC 230-min

Download the PLC program and the Bin directory for the AdvancedHMI screen.

Watch on YouTube : Building a PLC Program that You can be Proud Of – Part 5 – Game of Simon

Part 6 will look at a sequencer controlling seven cylinders that can be taught. The cylinders can be operator programmed from the AdvancedHMI screen.

If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.

Implementing the Omron CX Server DDE and Excel

Utilizing the CX Server DDE Manager will allow us to provide a link to the information in the Omron PLC. This link can be placed on an Excel spreadsheet. Charts, graphs, etc. can be made from the data. We will create links on an excel spread sheet from a CQM1H and a CP1L PLC. The information will then be displayed as a bar graph comparing the first ten memory areas.

Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) is a channel through which correctly prepared programs can actively exchange data and control other applications within Microsoft Windows. The DDE manager will allow us to set up all of the links.

Start the DDE Manager by clicking Start/Programs/Omron/CX-Server/DDE Manager
Omron CX-Server DDE 01-min

This will start the DDE Manager and place an icon on your toolbar at the bottom of your screen. The application will run minimized.
Omron CX-Server DDE 02-min

Right-click on the minimized DDE Manager icon and select Project/New.
Omron CX-Server DDE 03-min

Assign a filename (ACC DDE.cdm) to the CX-Server project that you will create, and save it.
Omron CX-Server DDE 04-min

The create project will minimize to the taskbar. Right-click on the minimized DDE Manager icon and select Project/Edit.
Omron CX-Server DDE 05-min

This will call up the DDE Manager Project Editor. We can now add the PLC’s (Devices) and Points that we want to display.
Omron CX-Server DDE 06-min

Select File/New/PLC, or hit the PLC Icon on the taskbar.
Omron CX-Server DDE 07-min

Under Change PLC, we can now enter the information about how we are communicating to the programmable logic controller.

Device Name: – Name in which the DDE Manager will call the PLC
Device Type: – The model of PLC that will be connected
Network Type: – This is the communication method that we will be talking with the device.

In our example we will use the following two Omron PLCs.

  • CQM1H – SYSMAC WAY (Omron Host Link Protocol) Communication Port  11, 9600, E, 7, 2. Unit #00
  • CP1L – USB

 Once we have the PLC information, we can now add points that will contain the information that we wish to retrieve from the units. Select File/New/Point  or select the point editor icon to start the point editor.
Omron CX-Server DDE 08-min

On the Logical tab you can give a name (Or Change) to the point in the PLC to get. Select the Physical tab.Omron CX-Server DDE 09-min

On the physical tab we set the following information:
PLC: – This is the list of PLCs entered in the previous step
Data Location: – The memory location that we want to read from
Internal Data Type: – This is the interpretation of the data that we are reading. (Example: Bit, Word, BCD, etc.)
Command Modifier: – This is used if we need to Force Set / Reset the data location. This can be used to override the PLC program. Use with caution.
Press OK when finished setting the address.Omron CX-Server DDE 10-min

 Our point is now programmed. You will notice the symbols before the name of the point. This tells us at a quick glance what type of data we are looking at. Please refer to the CX Server Runtime manual for all of the symbol meanings.Omron CX-Server DDE 11-min

Fill out the remaining points for our example.
CP1L – D0 to D9
CQM1H – DM0 to DM9Omron CX-Server DDE 12-min

Start Microsoft Excel.Omron CX-Server DDE 13-min

Go back to the DDE manager and the points under the Project Editor. We can now select the first ten items in the list. Click the first one and then move to the last item. Hold the shift while clicking the last item will select all of them between.
Hit the DDE Link icon.
Omron CX-Server DDE 14-min

In Excel, we now paste the information onto the worksheet. (Ctrl + V) Right click the cell and select paste. Omron CX-Server DDE 15-min

The information will now be displayed and updated  on your worksheet.
The update time will depend on the interval set in the DDE Manager. Right-click on the minimized DDE Manager icon and select Update Interval…Omron CX-Server DDE 16-min

We can also set individual point update times in the DDE link item. The default update time is set via the DDE Manager but we can also set the time in the individual points on the spreadsheet.
DDE Update Default Link:
=CDMDDE|’C:\ACC DDE.cdm’!’\CP1L D0′
5 Second Update Link:
=CDMDDE|’C:\ACC DDE.cdm’!’\CP1L D0,5′

In the Project Editor of the DDE Manager you can see the first 10 memory areas are being used. This is the yellow triangle with the lightning bolt symbol. (You will not be able to delete the point if it is in use.)Omron CX-Server DDE 17-min

Calling up an excel file with the links embedded, will give you a Security Alert – Links warning. Select ‘Enable the content’ and then hit OK.Omron CX-Server DDE 18-min

Here is an example of the finished excel file. We have 10 memory locations from each PLC listed. We have inserted a graph that will dynamically change when the values are read.
Download the excel file here.
Omron CX-Server DDE 19-min

 As you can see implementing the CX Server DDE Manager is not a difficult task. It provide a quick and efficient way to view the information that we need.

Additional Information:
Excel – Conditional Movement of Data

Watch on YouTube : Implementing the Omron CX Server DDE and Excel
If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.

How to Implement the Omron Host Link Protocol Part 2 – VBA

ACC Omron Host Link VBA

In Part 1, we used VB6 to communicate from the computer to the PLC. We will now use Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to accomplish the same task. NETComm will be the serial driver and Excel will be the program that we will use. Using Excel we will have access to the Excel Object Model so we can utilize worksheets, ranges etc.

Please refer to Part 1 (How to Implement the Omron PLC Host Link Protocol) for the details of the wiring of the serial port and protocol sequence.

The first step in using VBA is to download and register NETComm.ocx. To use serial communications with VBA you must register the NETComm.ocx driver.

Download the NETComm.ocx file to the c:\ directory.

Call up a dos prompt with administrator authority. (Right click on the cmd.exe program and select run as administrator.)
Command Prompt

Type ‘regsvr32 netcomm.ocx’
RegSvr32

An information box will be shown indicating that the NETComm.ocx was registered successfully.

Now open Excel and make the following on Sheet 1.
Excel Omron Host Link 01

Select Developer and then Visual Basic. Excel Omron Host Link 02

If you do not have the Developer option to select, then do the following:
Select File : Options: Customized Ribbon
Excel Omron Host Link 03Select Developer and hit OK

Microsoft-VBA-Large

VBA – Visual Basic for Applications will open
Excel Omron Host Link 04

Insert a user form.
Excel Omron Host Link 05

Add NETComm1 to UserForm1. If it is not on your Toolbar, then select additional controls and select NETCommOCX.NETComm. Press the OK. Then drag this control onto your form.
Excel Omron Host Link 06

Create three command buttons. This can be done by going to Design Mode,  and under the Insert menu you can select Command Buttons.Excel Omron Host Link 07

Here is the entire code for the application:

Private T$ ' Modual Scope for variable
Private TRead$
Private NumWords
Private startcycle
Private Sub CommandButton1_Click()
If NumWords = "" Then
    MsgBox "Set Read String"
    Exit Sub
End If
If startcycle = 0 Then
    startcycle = 1
    CommandButton1.BackColor = "&H0000FF00"
Else
    startcycle = 0
    CommandButton1.BackColor = "&H8000000F"
    UserForm1.NETComm1.PortOpen = False ' Close Communication Port
    Exit Sub
End If
UserForm1.NETComm1.PortOpen = True ' Open Communication Port
Application.EnableEvents = True
Do
    T$ = TRead$ ' Reset the Transmitted Information
    charreturn = 11 + (NumWords * 4) ' Determine the return characters
    GoSub FCS ' Checksum
    GoSub communicate ' Get informaiton
    
    'Check returned information and Display
    If Mid(rxd$, 6, 2) = "00" And (Len(rxd$)) >= charreturn Then
        For x = 1 To Sheets("Sheet1").Range("D7")
            Sheets("Sheet1").Range("B" & x + 10 - 1) = Mid(rxd$, x * 4 + 4, 4)
        Next 'x
    End If
    DoEvents ' Do other tasks
    'Update the date and time
    Sheets("Sheet1").Range("C09") = Format(Date, "YYYY/MM/DD") + "    " + Format(Time, "HH:MM:SS")
Loop While startcycle = 1
If startcycle = 0 Then Exit Sub
communicate:
rxd$ = ""
Buffer = T$ + FCS$ + "*" + Chr$(13)
UserForm1.NETComm1.Output = Buffer
Time1 = Now
Timeout = Now + TimeValue("0:00:02")
Do
    If Timeout <= Time1 Then GoTo timeoutcom
    DoEvents
    Time1 = Now()
Loop Until UserForm1.NETComm1.InBufferCount >= charreturn
rxd$ = UserForm1.NETComm1.InputData
fcs_rxd$ = Left((Right(rxd$, 4)), 2)
If Left(rxd$, 1) = "@" Then
    T$ = Mid(rxd$, 1, (Len(rxd$) - 4))
ElseIf Mid(rxd$, 2, 1) = "@" Then
    T$ = Mid(rxd$, 2, (Len(rxd$) - 5))
    rxd$ = Mid(rxd$, 2, (Len(rxd$) - 1))
End If
GoSub FCS
If FCS <> fcs_rxd$ Then
    rxd$ = ""
End If
clearbuffer$ = UserForm1.NETComm1.InputData
Return
FCS:
    L = Len(T$)
    A = 0
    For J = 1 To L
        TJ$ = Mid$(T$, J, 1)
        A = Asc(TJ$) Xor A
    Next J
    FCS$ = Hex$(A)
    If Len(FCS$) = 1 Then FCS$ = "0" + FCS$
Return
timeoutcom:
If startcycle = 0 Then Exit Sub
clearbuffer$ = UserForm1.NETComm1.InputData
rxd$ = ""
Return
End Sub
Private Sub CommandButton2_Click()
If startcycle = 0 Then
    UserForm1.NETComm1.CommPort = Sheets("Sheet1").Range("A4")
    UserForm1.NETComm1.Settings = Sheets("Sheet1").Range("B4") & "," & Sheets("Sheet1").Range("C4") & "," & Sheets("Sheet1").Range("D4") & "," & Sheets("Sheet1").Range("E4")
    MsgBox UserForm1.NETComm1.Settings
Else
    MsgBox "Stop Reading Parameters to Set MSComm"
End If
End Sub
Private Sub CommandButton3_Click()
If startcycle = 0 Then
    Unit = Sheets("Sheet1").Range("A7")
    If Len(Unit) < 2 Then Unit = "0" & Unit
    StartADD = Sheets("Sheet1").Range("C7")
    Do
        If Len(StartADD) < 4 Then
            StartADD = "0" & StartADD
        End If
    Loop Until Len(StartADD) = 4
    NumWords = Sheets("Sheet1").Range("D7")
    Do
        If Len(NumWords) < 4 Then
            NumWords = "0" & NumWords
        End If
    Loop Until Len(NumWords) = 4
    T$ = "@" & Unit & "RD" & StartADD & NumWords
    TRead$ = T$
    MsgBox T$
    For x = 1 To Sheets("Sheet1").Range("D7")
        Sheets("Sheet1").Range("A" & x + 10 - 1) = "DM " & Sheets("Sheet1").Range("C7") + x - 1
        Sheets("Sheet1").Range("B" & x + 10 - 1) = ""
    Next 'x
    For x = Sheets("Sheet1").Range("D7") To 200
        Sheets("Sheet1").Range("A" & x + 10) = ""
        Sheets("Sheet1").Range("B" & x + 10) = ""
    Next 'x
Else
    MsgBox "Stop Reading Parameters to Set Read String"
End If
End Sub
Private Sub Worksheet_SelectionChange(ByVal Target As Range)
End Sub

Note: The Chart on Sheet1 is just a selection of the first ten DM areas and insert a bar graph.

Running the program produces the following information:
 Excel Omron Host Link 08

Download the excel file ACC Omron Host Link VBA.XLS. This is the complete program mentioned above.

 

When you open the file it will warn you about macros. This is the VBA application. Press ‘Enable Macros’.
Security Warning

When changing the parameters on the screen, you will also get a warning about Active X. This is the NETComm.ocx which was registered above. Press ‘OK’ to run the application.
VBA Warning

Additional Information:
Excel – Conditional Movement of Data

Watch on YouTube : How to Implement the Omron Host Link Protocol Part 2 – VBA
If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.

Who Else Wants To Discover Takt Time?

Takt time is the beat of manufacturing. It is the rhythm of the company for making products or delivering service. Do you know what yours is? Let’s take a look at takt time and determine how to use it to our advantage.

This is a German word taken from beats in music, and used in lean manufacturing. Takt time is calculated by the total available time divided by the customer demand. This must be greater than our ability to produce product or we would be letting our customers down.Takt Time Balance

Takt Time = Total Available Time / Customer Demand 

Total Available Time:
This is the total available time for work to be performed. Lunch, breaks and daily meeting times are removed from this total, unless they are constantly covered by relief.

Customer Demand:
This is the average rate at which customers purchase products or service. It is expressed in the same time frame as Total Available Time. You can also look at projected purchases from the customer.

Example:
Total Available Time (Day):
8 hour shift x 60 = 480 minutes
480 minutes – (2*10 minute breaks) – (20 minute lunch) = 440 minutes
Customer Demand (Day):
500 units / 5 days = 100 units a day
Takt Time (Product Unit):
Total Available Time / Customer Demand
440 minutes / 100 units a day = 4.4 minutes or 264 seconds
Each product unit must be produced within 4.4 minutes.

Takt time is the pace the customer requires product. This is different from Lead Time, which is the total production time from product start to finish. The other definitions that get confused are Cycle Time and Target Cycle Time. The Target Cycle Time is the pace at which we will produce to ensure we meet customer demand. Cycle Time is the time the process cycles. Keep in mind all of these items when looking at satisfying customer demand.Takt Cycle Target Cycle Lead Times

Takt time is just a value that will show you your ability to meet customer demand. Material or the lack of it behind each machine is the indication within manufacturing that will show you your current situation. Stock will buffer the unevenness of work and breaks in the manufacturing process. The goal is to synchronise the flow from the first process to the last.

If customer demand is greater than the ability to produce the product or service then you would find that stock would be running out.Takt Time Demand High

If customer demand is less than the ability to produce the product or service then you would find an increase in stock.Takt Time Demand Low

A bottleneck is a point of congestion in a system. Work arrives quicker than what can be handled. It looks like the neck of a bottle which limits the ability to have liquid pass through. On the manufacturing floor, you can notice bottlenecks by the amount of material behind machines.

Bottleneck operations are those operations where the machine cycle > Takt Time.

BottleneckThe goal is to eliminate the bottlenecks by looking at our ability to handle customer demand through measures like Takt Time. This does not have to be a hard task. We have the ability through PLCs and data collection to monitor all of the different times discussed and ensure we satisfy customer demand.

Watch on YouTube : Who Else Wants To Discover Takt Time?
If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.

What Everybody Ought to Know About PLC Programming Languages

PLC programs are normally written in a special application on a personal computer, then downloaded to the PLC. This downloaded program is similar to compiled code to keep the program efficient. The program is stored in the PLC either in battery-backed-up RAM or some other non-volatile flash memory.

Albert Einstein said “The world as we have created it is a process of our thinking. It cannot be changed without changing our thinking” PLC programming languages have evolved to both adapt and change the way we program these units. We will look at all five programming languages as defined by the IEC 61131-3 Standard.

  • Structured Text (ST)
  • Function Block Diagram (FBD)
  • Sequential Function Chart (SFC)
  • Instruction List (IL)
  • Ladder Diagram (LD)

Not all of these programmable controller languages are available in every PLC. Ladder logic programming is by far the largest percentage of use in PLC’s today. Fundamental concepts of PLC programming are common to all manufacturers. Differences in I/O addressing, memory organization, and instruction sets mean that PLC programs are never interchangeable between different makers. Even within the same product line of a single manufacturer, different models may not be directly compatible. This is true when looking at manufactures that private label other controllers.

Estimates are as high as 95% of installations use ladder logic programming in the programmable logic controller.

The PLC programming language that is used can be decided when you look at the following:

  • Maintenance and troubleshooting
  • Knowledge of language
  • Acceptance of the country, location, or individual plant
  • Application of the PLC
  • Ease of changing PLC program

The actual programming of the PLC is the second last step in the development of programs. The five steps to PLC program development is a good method to follow before picking what programming language to use. As mentioned before the languages supported by each PLC may differ. Please refer to the types of programming that are available for your model and version of PLC.

Let’s quickly review some of the different programming languages for the PLC.

Structured Text (ST) is a high level programming language that closely resembles Pascale programming. Statements are used to define what to execute.
ST MP50pro_st

Function Block Diagram (FBD) is a graphical representation of AND, NAND, OR, NOR gates, etc. that are drawn. It will describe the function between input and output variables.
FBD MP50pro_fbd

Sequential Function Chart (SFC) is like a flowchart of your program. It defines the steps through which your program moves.
SFC MP50pro_sfc

Instruction List (IL) can also be referred to as mnemonic code and statement list. It contains simple instructions for looking at your variables.
IL MP50pro_il

Ladder Diagram (LD) is the most popular programming language for the PLC. It was written to mimic the mechanical relays in the panel that the programmable logic controller replaced. It has two vertical rails and a series of horizontal rungs between them. Controllers will usually scan from left to right top to bottom. The output of one rung is available for the next rung.
LD MP50pro_ladder

Note: All pictures from PLCopen IEC 61131 Basics

PLC programming methods are evolving. PLC Open is an organization that is defining new methods to take advantage of the latest computer innovations. They have defined the IL method of programming to XML (Extended Markup Language) which is used for web development. This in my opinion keeps moving the ideal method, to a standard way to program PLCs.

If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

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PLC Programming Example – Paint Spraying

We will look at a PLC basic tutorial of a paint spraying station. Following the 5 steps to program development this PLC programming example should fully explain the procedure for developing the PLC program logic. Ladder will be our PLC programming language.

We will be using the Do-more Designer software which comes with a simulator. This fully functional program is offered free of charge at automation direct.

Define the task:

What has to happen?
Paint Station 01

Paint spraying system where boxes are fed by gravity through a feeder magazine one at a time onto a moving conveyor belt. Upon the start signal, boxes are pushed towards the conveyor by valve 1. This is a cylinder which extends and retracts which operates switches S1 and S2 respectfully. A spraying nozzle paints each box as it passes under the paint spray controlled by valve 2. A sensor (S3) counts each box being sprayed. When 6 boxes have been painted the valve 2 shuts off (paint spray) and valve 1 (cylinder) stops moving boxes onto the conveyor. Three seconds later the conveyor stops moving and the hopper with its load moves forward (valve 3) where it is emptied. Ten seconds later the hopper returns to the original position. The cycle is then complete and waits for a start signal again.

Define the Inputs and Outputs:

Inputs:
Start Switch – On/Off (Normally Open) – NO
Stop Switch – On/Off (Normally Closed) – NC
S1 – Valve 1 (cylinder retract) On/Off – NO
S2 – Valve 1 (cylinder extend) On/Off – NO
S3 – Box Detected- On/Off – NO
Outputs:
Motor – On/Off (Conveyor Run)
Valve 1- Cylinder to feed boxes – On/Off
Valve 2- Paint Spray – On/Off
Valve 3- Cylinder to move hopper – On/Off

Develop a logical sequence of operation:

Fully understanding the logic before starting to program can save you time and frustration.

Sequence Table: The following is a sequence table for our paint spraying application.

Sequence Table
1 – Input / Ouput ON
0 – Input / Output OFF
x – Input / Output Does not Matter
When power goes off and comes on the sequence will continue. This means that we must use memory retentive areas of the PLC. The stop pushbutton will stop the sequence. The start will resume until the end.

Develop the PLC program:

The best way to see the development of the programmable logic controller program is to follow the sequence table along with the following program. You will see the direct correlation between the two and get a good understanding of the process.

This is the main process start and stop bit. V0:0 is used because it is memory retentive.
Paint Stn Program 1

Control of the Motor (Conveyor) and the paint spray is done with the V0:0 contact in front of the actual PLC output. The conveyor and paint spray will stop when the timer 0 is done. This is the delay after the last box is detected to allow the box to be painted and loaded onto the hopper.
Paint Stn Program 2

Control of the box movement onto the conveyor. As long as we have the process start and the hopper count is not complete this will allow the cylinder to put boxes on the conveyor.
Paint Stn Program 3

Count number of boxes in the hopper via S3. The counter is memory retentive.
Paint Stn Program 4

Timer to stop the conveyor and spray after the last box is detected for the hopper. This will allow time for the box to be sprayed and loaded into the hopper.
Paint Stn Program 5

Hopper movement to load and unload the boxes.
Paint Stn Program 6

The hopper unload timer is to unload the boxes and will then trigger the reset conveyor timer, box counter and the process start bit (V0:0).
Paint Stn Program 7

Test the program:

Paint Spraying
Test the program with a simulator or actual machine. Make modifications as necessary. Remember to follow up after a time frame to see if any problems arise that need to be addressed with the program.

Watch on YouTube : PLC Programming Example – Paint Spraying
If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.