Tag Archives: plc programming examples and solutions

Now You Can Have Data Logging Free

A data logger is also known as a data recorder or  data acquisition. It is a method to record data over a period of time and/or events.

The recorded information can come from sensors in the field. They can be digital or analog. With analog (voltage or current) we can measure temperature, pressure, sound, weight, length, etc. Digital data can be used for counts, times, events (motor overload), etc.

Data collecting can be time or event driven. Time based would be like collecting data every minute, shift, day etc. An event based collection would be from an error in the field such as an overload of a motor or a fault with a temperature controller.

stock-vector-analysis-magnifying-glass-over-seamless-background-with-different-association-terms-vector-69601843

Data mining / analysis is the most important part of the data logging.

Data mining / analysis is the way in which we look at the data and determine  what to do. Clustering is a method to look at the data in similar groups for comparison. An example of this would be the amount of material made on individual shifts in the plant.  Setting up the data logging in a way to examine the output over time is very helpful in determining methods to increase productivity in the manufacturing environment.

Time studies or observations are vital in the lean manufacturing world. Data logging can be useful in assisting with these studies. However, unlike the usual manual approach, this time study can be continuous.

Doing Time Observations

ebook_RobustDataLoggingforFreeData logging does not have to be expensive. It is also not as intimidating as it may sound.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is available in a free download. Just subscribe to ACC Automation to get the link for the free download.
 
This eBook will walk you though step by step on getting information into a database so you can start analysing the data. With traditional loggers, software will read the memory of the PLC and store in a local computer. If the network stops or the PLC communication fails then the logging will stop.
Creating a robust PLC data logger allows the communication to be stopped for a period of time without losing any of the data for collection. This is accomplished by storing the data locally on the PLC until communication is restored. All of the data is then read without loss. The amount of time that the connection can be lost will be dependent on the memory size of the PLC and the frequency of the data collected.
This series will walk you through the steps to create and implement a robust PLC data logger using the following equipment and hardware.
  • Automation Direct – Do-More – H2-DM1E PLC (Ethernet Modbus TCP)
  • Do-more Designer 1.3 (Simulator instead of PLC mentioned above)
  • Windows based computer running IIS
  • Visual Basic 6

Additional information on Omron Host Link Protocol and Indirect Addressing can be found in the eBook.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is available for a free download. Just subscribe to ACC Automation on the left side menu of the website to get the link for the free download.

Watch on YouTube : Now You Can Have Robust Data Logging For Free
If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.

How you can learn PLC Programming without spending a dime!

I have been writing PLC programs for over 20 years. I often get asked what is the best way to lean PLC programming. Programming in the way I was taught in college was with the Motorola 6809. (Yes, I know that I am dating myself) This was microprocessor programming, but it was the best way to sometimes explain the methods behind PLC programming. Manufacturers of PLCs had allot of proprietary software that were not even related in their appearance and methods of programming. Today we have a few standards that have changed the look and feel of the programming software packages so each manufacturer is similar. The following is the best recommendation that I have for beginners to start to learn PLC programming today.

start stop 003

The first place to start in order to learn PLC programming is the free publication by Kevin Collins. This PDF will teach you PLC programming without just telling you what a PLC is and how it functions. He also includes some test questions along the way in order for you to retain and understand the important points that he is making.

PLC Programming for Industrial Automation
by Kevin Collins
(Note: This book is now for sale on Amazon.)
https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Industrial-Automation-Kevin-Collins/dp/1846855985
Topics covered include:

  • PLC Basics
  • Ladder Programming
  • Conditional Logic
  • Ladder Diagrams
  • Normally closed contacts
  • Outputs and latches
  • Internal relays
  • Timers
  • The Pulse Generator
  • Counters
  • Sequential Programming Introduction
  • Evolution of the Sequential Function Chart
  • Programming using the Sequential Function Chart
  • Entering the SFC program into the PLC
  • Modifying an SFC Program
  • Selective Branching
  • Parallel Branching

GreyToBinaryCode

Simulator

After learning the basics from the above manual, practice. Create programs yourself and test what you have learned. You can accomplish this by using simulators. Allot of the programming software will have simulators. The simulator will mimic the PLC hardware so you can test your programs before installing in the field. Traditionally I have not been a fan of simulators, but recently Automation Direct has introduced a simulator with their Do-More PLC. It is the Do-More Designer Software. This software simulator includes the entire instruction set (Not Just Bit Logic) as well as communication protocols. It can be downloaded and installed for free from the above link.

Indirect Addressing 2 Pointer

The next step I recommend is then to advance into some of the advanced instructions. An understanding of the numbering systems in the PLC will be a benefit. Math, PID, register manipulation and conversion instructions are just a few of the advanced programming you can learn. All of these and more instruction information can be obtained from reviewing the documentation from the PLC manual that you are programming. Once again all of these instructions are included in the Do-More Designer Software.

Indirect Addressing Animation

Program structure is the next topic. Allot of programmers would stop here and can do well with developing software, however there is much more that you can lean.  Sequencers give programmers the methods to change logic on the fly and allow troubleshooting the system easier. This method of programming can benefit you greatly and reduce the development time of your logic.

Omron HostLink Frame_Responseadu_pdu

The last step that I recommend learning is the sharing of information. I am meaning the information that you program through an HMI and/or SCADA package. This refers to understanding of the ways in which information can be gathered from the PLC and displayed in different ways. Here are a couple of previous articles that have been written on this subject:

How to Implement the Omron PLC Host Link Protocol 

Robust PLC Data Logger

iis107 display

As you can see, there is allot of information available to you to begin and lean PLC programming without spending a dime!  Remember that PLCs are similar to computers, (Moore’s Law) they increase in size and ability. Systems are expanding and changing everyday. Happy programming.

Do you know of additional tips or methods to share?

Watch on YouTube : How you can learn PLC Programming without spending a dime!

If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.

Here is a Method That is Helping PLC Programmers to Program Faster

PLC programming involves both direct and indirect addressing. Direct address programming involves writing each ladder logic rung to do the operation required. We often forget about using the powerful indirect addressing to solve our logic.

The below animated picture will show a simple example of using indirect addressing. This will use the MOVE instruction and transfer a word indirectly to output word V100. V[V0] means that the value in V0 will point to the V memory to get the value to move. You can think of this as a pointer for the memory location to move.

Indirect Addressing Animation

Of course we need to monitor V0. Our values are in sequence from V1 to V6. We need to ensure that V0 is always in the range from 1 to 6.

Lets take a look at a program sample using the Do-more Designer Software. We will set up the sequence similar to the animation above, but expand the program.
Just like above we will set up the pointer at V0 and the output at V100 memory locations. V1 to V37 will hold our output data sequence. This is outputs that we want to set on each event and/or time frame. You can see some of the registers and the corresponding values. These are set as a hexadecimal value. The following link will provide a review of the numbering systems in the PLC. (WHAT EVERYBODY OUGHT TO KNOW ABOUT PLC (PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLER) NUMBERING SYSTEMS)

Indirect Addressing 4 Data

This is the logic to set up the move instruction. The source is V[V0] which means the pointer is V0 in this memory area. The destination will be V100.

Indirect Addressing 1 MOV

An internal timing bit ST5($100ms) is used to increment the pointer V0. This could also be done by an event or series of events. The pointer is then compared to ensure that it is between 1 and 37.

Indirect Addressing 2 Pointer

Finally the output word is then transferred to the physical outputs. This is done by using the MAPIO instruction. Each bit can be set independently.

This example uses indirect addressing to program a sequence based upon time. We could just as easily used indirect addressing to compare inputs to a table and set the outputs accordingly. You can see how this method can greatly reduce the amount of time to develop your program. This holds especially true if the sequence needs to be changed. It would be just a matter of changing data values in the table.

The following are separate posts that use indirect addressing:

Building a PLC Program You Can Be Proud Of – Part 1
This use the control of an intersection traffic light to demonstrate direct versus indirect addressing.

Building a PLC Program That You Can Be Proud Of – Part 2
A sample program to control valves. This uses indirect addressing for the inputs as well as the outputs.

Now You Can Have Robust Data Logging for Free – Part 1
Using indirect addressing, this sample program will log information in the PLC to be retrieved at a later time.

Indirect addressing is a powerful method of programming to simplify and program faster than you ever thought possible. You can even use indirect addressing in the PLC to scale a non-linear analog input signal. Let me know you thoughts on using indirect addressing. What can you come up with?

Watch on YouTube : Here is a Method That is Helping PLC Programmers to Program Faster

If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.

The Secret of Using Counters

funny_counter

Counters  are used in the majority of PLC programs. This is especially true if part of your SCADA system. Counters like the animated picture above count things. In this situation we are counting the number of turns the little guy makes. The counter is displaying the total number. This is considered a totalizing counter. If an output turned on to do something then it would be a preset (target number entered for the count) counter. There are also a wide variety of off the shelf industrial counters that you can use. The implementation of counters can be vast, however it all starts with a TIMING CHART. This is the same as the timing charts we discussed in ‘The Secret of Timers’ post.

A timing chart is the secret behind understanding of the counter that you need in your application. Making a timing chart before writing the program will ensure that all of the information will be accounted.

The timing chart is mapped out on a x and y plain. The ‘y’ plain has the state of the input on/off (1 or 0). The ‘x’ plain will show time.

The following shows a timing chart for a counter:
timing chart counterAs you can see in this timing chart, you have an input, output and display.

Inputs:
Inputs are used usually sensors that are wired to the counter (PLC) to indicate the items that we need to count. They can be switches, photoelectric sensors, proximity sensors, encoders, etc. (Wiring of NPN / PNP devices) A counter will generally have only one input. In the case of an encoder input it is still only one input, however this is wired usually as a A, B and Z phase. Z is always the reset. A and B indicate the pulses and are leading or trailing each other by 90 degrees depending on direction. Allot of counters will also allow you to as a direction input signal. However this is all still only one input.
Output ModesInput Modes

Outputs:
Outputs from counters are generally discrete. This means that they are on or off, similar to the inputs. Outputs will trigger when the count value matches the set value. The duration that the output is on depends on the reset signal, to start the count again. (DC Solenoids protection) Allot of the counters today will allow you to have multiple outputs. These multifunction counters can have several preset outputs that trigger when the counter set value has been reached. Batch outputs are also available on some of the industrial counters. A batch output counts the number of times that the preset has been reached. This output will be turned on when the number entered for the batch has been reached.

Set Value – SV:
This is usually on the display and shows the preset value. It is the target number of counts.

Present Value – PV:
This is usually on the display and shows the current or accumulated value.

Roller Measurment

The PLC programming is usually not that much different then the industrial counter. Allot of the manufactures will have an up counter, down counter and/or an up/down counter. Just as the name implies the display is either counting up or down. You have to refer to the instruction manual of the manufacturer you are programming for the way in which the counter will be programmed.

Do-More Up and Down Counter

In the above example Do-More PLC program we have an up and a down counter. X0 is the input and X1 is the reset on both of these counters. (CT0, CT1)
The preset value is stored in memory location D0. This value is set to the number 3.
When the present value (accumulated) reaches the set value (preset) then the CT0.Done bit goes on and the output Y0 is active. Y0 will remain on until the reset input goes on.
The only difference for down counter is the display. You will see that the present value will count down to zero (0) before the CT1.Done bit is turned on.
These counters are memory retentive. So in order to make the counter non-memory retentive, use the first scan bit of the PLC to trigger the reset of the counter. (ST0 – $FirstScan)

Every PLC has counters. They all have different types depending on what you are trying to achieve. It will all start with your Timing Chart.

Watch on YouTube : Learn PLC Programming – Free 9 – The Secret of Counters

If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.

Building a PLC Program That You Can Be Proud Of – Part 2

In part 1 we looked at writing PLC programs to control a traffic light using discrete bits and then using timed sequencing using indirect addressing.  We will now look at how we can use indirect addressing for inputs as well as output to control the sequence in the program.

Lets look at an example of controlling pneumatic (air) cylinders.

Video of  Pneumatic Cylinder Sequencing on YouTube.

This site contains a video of the three cylinders and the sequence required.

This program will have the following inputs. Even thought no sensors are mounted on the cylinders, it is best to have sensor inputs when the cylinder is extended (out) and retracted (in)
Inputs:
Cylinder 1 In – X1
Cylinder 1 Out – X2
Cylinder 2 In – X3
Cylinder 2 Out – X4
Cylinder 3 In – X5
Cylinger 3 Out – X6
Start PB NO – X7
Stop PB NO – X8
Step PB NO – X9

This program will have the following outputs.
Outputs:
Cylinder 1 In – Y1
Cylinder 1 Out – Y2
Cylinder 2 In – Y3
Cylinder 2 Out – Y4
Cylinder 3 In – Y5
Cylinger 3 Out – Y6

We will use the following pointers:
V0 – Output pointer starting at address V2000
V1 – Input pointer starting at address V1000
V10 will be the input word
V20 will be the output word

Before we start and write the code lets look at the sequence that we are trying to accomplish. The best way to do this is a chart indicating the inputs and output. I use either graph paper or a spreadsheet software to configure the sequence.
I usually start with the outputs configure the sequence that I would like to see. Then based upon the output sequence, I figure out the input sequence.

Note: Here is the location for a quick review of numbering systems from a previous post.

Once the sequence has been established, the next step is writing the program.
Input program that will set the input bits in V10.

Control part of the program:
The first scan will reset the input and output pointers.
The input pointer is compared to the input word V10. If they are equal then the output pointer and input pointer are incremented. If the STEP input is hit, then the output and input pointers are incremented.
The output pointer is then compared to the maximum value (end of sequence). If it is greater than or equal to the maximum value then the pointers will be reset.
Line 12 will move the outputs indirectly to the output word.

Output program that will set the actual outputs based upon the bits in V20

As you can see the actual program is very small however the sequence can be thousands of steps. This is a very straight forward and powerful method of programming. Programming this sequence using bits, timers and no indirect addressing would be very difficult and hard to read. Modifications would have to be a complete re-write of the program.

Modifications:
The entire program sequence could change without further lines of code. Only the values in the registers would need to be modified. This could lead to different sequences for different products.
We used a step input to have the program move forward through the sequence. It would be just as easy to add a step reverse function for the program. We would just have decrement the pointers and check to make sure when we were at the beginning of the sequence.

Troubleshooting:
When troubleshooting this program we would only need to look at the compares to determine what input and or output is not working correctly.

Integration with a touch panel display is simplified when using this type of programming method.

What other advantages do you see?

In Part 3 we will build on the traffic light sequencing used in part one with inputs for pedestrian and car detection.

Contact me for the above program. I will be happy to email it to you.
If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry

You can download the software and simulator free at the following address. Also listed are helpful guides to walk you through your first program.
Do-more Designer Software

How to use video’s for Do-more Designer Software




If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.