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Articles BRX Do-More Do-More EasyPLC Machine Simulator PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning Productivity 1000 Productivity 2000 Productivity 3000 Productivity Suite

3 Steps to PLC Programming – Learning

You’ve had this idea for years since you were a kid. You want to be an electrical engineer, and you’re finally going to follow through on it and learn PLC programming to start your career off right! What? That’s what you thought, anyway. But then you started googling around, trying to figure out how to begin learning PLC programming, and it sounds like it will take forever! How are you supposed to know which software is the best option? Which hardware should you buy?
Don't Get Caught Without These 3 PLC RequirementsWe will look at three steps to kick off your PLC programming and determine if this learning is proper for you. Let’s get started.

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Articles BRX Do-More Counters Do-More Do-More Designer Inputs Outputs PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning Scan Timers

Timing Diagram NOT Just Used for a Timer

Logic circuits in a PLC ladder logic program are either on or off. The inputs change, which will affect the outputs. This can be expressed in a timing diagram. The timing diagram or chart will show you how the ladder logic program will respond to the changing states of the inputs and outputs.
Timing Diagram NOT Just Used for a Timer
This visual method is an excellent way of understanding how the PLC ladder logic functions. We will discuss a timing diagram and how it is used for timers, counters, and ladder logic. This will help in understanding or troubleshooting your PLC programs. Let’s get started.

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Articles PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning

PLC Learning Series – Programming Steps

Developing a programmable logic controller (PLC) program can be broken down into five steps. These programming steps are as follows:
Five Steps to PLC Program Development
Step 1 – Define the task
Step 2 – Define the Inputs and Outputs
Step 3 – Develop a logical sequence of operation
Step 4 – Develop the PLC program
Step 5 – Test the program
These five steps to PLC program development will help you understand, program, and troubleshoot your automated machine.
PLC Learning Series – Programming StepsWe will look at each of these steps in more detail as we discuss the PLC programming development. Let’s get started.

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Inputs Outputs PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning Productivity Suite Scan

PLC Learning Series – Program Cyclic Scan

Programmable logic controllers (PLC) use a cyclic scan. The time that it takes to complete one scan is called Scan Time. Typical scan times range from 10 milliseconds to 10 microseconds. This translates from 0.01 to 0.0001 seconds per PLC scan. Understanding how the program scan will help us in programming and troubleshooting the PLC.
The simplest scan cycle of a PLC consists of 4 steps. Read inputs, execute program, diagnostics, and communication, and update outputs.
We will be looking at each of these steps in a little more detail as we discuss the PLC program cyclic scan. Let’s get started.

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Articles HMI PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning

PLC Learning Series – Understanding Numbers

All programmable logic controllers (PLC) have the same numbering system at their core. This is the same with all computers as well. The status of any memory location can be either on or off. A one (1) will represent an on or “True” status and zero (0) will represent an off or “False” status. This is called binary.

Understanding PLC Numbering Systems
We will be looking at how numbering systems work and some of the common systems that programmable logic controllers use. Let’s get started.

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Articles BRX Do-More Click Click PLUS Devices PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning

PLC Learning Series – Memory Backup

PLC memory is very similar to personal computer memory. There is the operating system and firmware of the processor and connected modules. PLC programs and data that are used by the program are also stored in the memory.
PLC Learning Series – Memory BackupWe will now look at the basic understanding of memory in the PLC. Looking at two examples of PLC specifications. We will see how the program is stored and how long data memory will remain when the PLC is not powered up. Let’s get started.