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BRX Do-More Do-More Do-More Designer PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning

BRX Do-More PLC Math Instructions

Math instructions are used to perform mathematical calculations. The BRX Do-More PLC has math instructions that can be used in a wide variety of applications. We will be looking at the INC increment, DEC decrement, LERP linear Interpolation, RANDSEED Random Number Seed, and the MATH Calculated Expression instructions. The automation system that you implement may involve some or all of these instructions. As a system integrator, you will require the use of these instructions in your commissioned programs.
Let’s get started with the BRX Do-More PLC Math Instructions.

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BRX Do-More Do-More Do-More Designer PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning

BRX Do-More PLC Compare Instructions

Compare instruction is often used in PLC programs to test pairs of values. The output of this comparison conditions the logical continuity of a rung. The BRX Do-More series of programmable logic controllers have the following compare contact instructions.
= (if Equal contact)
<> (if Not Equal contact)
> (if Greater Than contact)
>= (if Greater Than or Equal contact)
< (if Less Than contact)
<= (if Less Than or Equal contact)
Besides this instruction, the BRX Do-More PLC will also have to compare instructions for the built-in real-time clock of the system. We will be looking at these instructions along with some programming examples. As a system integrator, this ability can prove very useful to you in the field when commissioning your automation system.
Let’s get started with the BRX Do-More PLC Compare Instructions.

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BRX Do-More Do-More Do-More Designer PLC PLC Learning Sensors

BRX Do-More PLC High Speed IO (Input / Output)

The BRX Do-More series of programmable logic controllers has built in high speed inputs and outputs. Every CPU will have either 6 or 10 high speed inputs (HSI) available depending on the model. These inputs can be used for input frequencies from 0 to 250Khz. 250Khz represents 250000 input counts per second that can be coming from devices connected to your PLC like an encoder. Every BRX Do-More CPU unit also has 2, 4 or 8 high speed outputs (HSO) available depending on the model. The outputs can send a frequency of pulses out up to 250Khz. Due to the speed of the IO, these functions available on the BRX Do-More PLC will operate asynchronous with the PLC scan time.
We will be looking at sending an output of pulses at different frequencies from our BRX Do-More PLC and inputting these back into the high speed inputs of the PLC. So our output will be wired back into our input. We will then display the frequency of the input pulses and the count. As a system integrator, this ability to send and receive high speed inputs and outputs can prove very useful to you in the field when commissioning your automation system.
Let’s get started with the BRX Do-More PLC High Speed IO.

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BRX Do-More Counters Do-More Do-More Designer PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning

BRX Do-More PLC Counters Explained

A majority of the programmable logic controller (PLC) programs will include a counter instruction. The BRX Do-More series of programmable logic controllers have several different counters available for your program. There are five different basic counter instructions in the PLC. The memory area for counters (CT) includes the Counter PVs (Present Values) Counter SVs (Set Values) and the Counter Completion Flags. The default size of the counter area is CT0 – CT255. This size can change to the amount that we need for our program. Please see BRX Do-More PLC Numbering Systems and Addressing on how to change the memory configuration of the controller.
We will be looking at the counter instructions in the BRX Do-More PLC along with some programming examples. As a system integrator, this ability can prove very useful to you in the field when commissioning your automation system. When dealing with counters, we need to look at timing charts. The Secret of Using Counters is a good refresher on using timing charts.
Let’s get started with the BRX Do-More PLC Counters.

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BRX Do-More Do-More Do-More Designer PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning Timers

BRX Do-More PLC Timers – How to Use

A majority of the programmable logic controller (PLC) programs will include a timer instruction. The BRX Do-More series of programmable logic controllers have several different timers available for your program. There are nine different basic timing instructions in the PLC. The memory area for timers includes the Timer PVs (Present Values) Timer SVs (Set Values) and the Timer Completion Flags. The default size of the timer area is T0 – T255. This size can change to the amount that we need for our program. Please see BRX Do-More PLC Numbering Systems and Addressing on how to change the memory configuration of the controller.
We will be looking at the timer instructions in the BRX Do-More PLC along with some programming examples. As a system integrator, this ability can prove very useful to you in the field when commissioning your automation system. When dealing with timers, we need to look at timing charts. The Secret of Using Timers is a good refresher on using timing charts.
Let’s get started with the BRX Do-More PLC Timers.

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BRX Do-More Do-More Do-More Designer Factory IO PLC PLC Basics PLC Learning

BRX Do-More PLC Online Editing and Debug Mode

We will now look at online editing and the powerful debug mode of our BRX Do-More controller. Our first program for the BRX Do-More PLC involved a start-stop jog circuit. We will now use the Do-More Designer Software to modify this program while the PLC is scanning the logic. This is referred to as online programming or online editing. As a system integrator, this ability can prove very useful to you in the field when commissioning your automation system.
We will also be using the special Debug Mode of the software to monitor the ladder logic status and bits on a scan by scan basis. Forcing the inputs and outputs, we will control the execution of the PLC scan. This is a great feature of the Do-More Designer software.
Here is a link explaining the logic behind our circuit.
How to Make a Start Stop Jog Circuit in a PLC
Let’s get started.