Tag Archives: plc basics tutorial

Wiring an Ultrasonic Proximity Sensor to the Click PLC

An ultrasonic sensor (switch) is able to detect object presence without physical contact (limit switch). No physical contact means that the switch has no parts that will wear out. The life span of the sensor is increased with less maintenance.
An ultrasonic sensor will use sound waves to detect objects. These sound waves are at a level that we cannot hear. Distance is measured by the time it takes to send and receive the ultrasonic wave. Objects can be measured the same no matter what the colour, transparency, shininess, or lighting conditions of the application.

We will be wiring an ultrasonic sensor into the input of our Click PLC. This will include a discrete and analog input signal. The UK1F-E7-0A is an 18mm diameter sensor that has a PNP N.O./N.C. selectable output with analog output of 0 -10 VDC. The sensing distance is 200mm to 2200mm and has a one-hertz switching capacity. A 4-pin M12 quick disconnect is available but we will be wiring in our 2m wired version. Let’s get started. Continue Reading!

Wiring a Capacitive Proximity NPN PNP Sensor to the Click PLC

A proximity sensor (switch) is able to detect object presence without physical contact like a limit switch. No physical contact means that the switch has no parts that will wear out. The life span of the sensor is increased with less maintenance.
A capacitive proximity sensor will detect ferrous and non-ferrous objects. The sensor works by oscillating the charge on the plates in the sensor. When an object is placed in front of the surface, the amount of current flow is detected. (Capacitance) The dielectric of objects will determine the distance that the object can be detected.

We will be wiring a capacitive proximity switch into the input of our Click PLC. The CK1-00-2H is an 18mm diameter, NPN/PNP N.O./N.C. selectable output with a 12mm sensing distance. That means that the sensor can be wired as positive (Sourcing) or negative (Sinking) switch. This unshielded 10 Hz switching frequency sensor also has a 4-pin M12 quick disconnect. Let’s get started. Continue Reading!

Wiring an Inductive Proximity NPN PNP Sensor to the Click PLC

A proximity sensor (switch) is able to detect object presence without physical contact like a limit switch. No physical contact means that the switch has no parts that will wear out. The life span of the sensor is increased with less maintenance.
An inductive proximity sensor will detect ferrous metals. The sensor develops an electric field when metal (sensing object) is introduced usually killing the oscillation circuit of the sensor triggering the output.

We will be wiring an inductive proximity switch into the input of our Click PLC. The AM1-A0-4A is an extended range 12mm tubular sensor that can be wired into the PLC as a sink or source input. Let’s get started. Continue Reading!

Wiring Push Buttons and Selector Switch to Click PLC

A push button (pushbutton) is a simple human interface for controlling some aspect of a machine or process. The push button requires a force to push the button to change the electrical operation from off to on or vice versa. The condition of the output is usually momentarily. Some common everyday pushbuttons we use are keyboards keys.

A selector switch is also a mechanical device that will require a force to turn the electrical operation from off to on or vice versa. The selector switch usually locks into a position.

We will be wiring two illuminated pushbutton switches into our Click PLC. A selector switch will also be wired in. Let’s get started. Continue Reading!

Omron CP1H AdvancedHMI Communication

Advanced HMI is a powerful, adaptable HMI/SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) development package that takes advantage of Visual Studio. There is no coding required and you can simply drag and drop items onto the page. The best thing is that the software is free. We will look at using AdvancedHMI with the Omron CP1H PLC.
Our sample CP1H PLC program will use button and indicators to control a start/stop jog circuit. An analog input into the PLC will be scaled and displayed on a gauge on our AdvancedHMI screen. We will also write information to our 7 segment display on the CPU from our AdvancedHMI screen. This communication will be done using Omron serial host link protocol over a RS485 serial cable. The AdvancedHMI package will run on a windows PC and communicate out the port using a USB to RS485 adapter. Let’s get started. Continue Reading!

Omron CP1H Data Control Instructions

The data control instructions in the Omron CP1H programmable logic controller are used to manipulate the outputs based upon control conditions. Control is the main purpose of these instructions within the PLC. Instructions include PID (Proportional, Integral and Derivative), PID with Auto tuning, Dead Band Control, Limit, Dead Zone Control, Time Proportional Output, Scaling, etc.
We will be looking at some of these instructions in the Omron CP1H PLC. Examples of the instructions will be presented. Continue Reading!

Omron CP1H Table Data Instructions

The Omron CP1H programmable logic controller has several different table data processing instructions. These instructions are used to handle table data, stacks and other ranges of data.
We can define a stack of data. With this data we can then do the following: add new data by pushing onto the stack, use FIFO (First In First Out), use LIFO (Last In First Out), find the current stack size and read, overwrite, insert or delete from the stack.
Dimension record tables are used to define the length of each record and the number of records. We can then write and read these records. This is ideal for data acquisition projects.
Other instructions found in the table data processing instructions include searching, summing and finding minimum and maximum values.
We will be looking at these instructions in the Omron CP1H PLC. Examples of the instructions will be presented. Continue Reading!

Omron CP1H Program Control Instructions

The Omron CP1H programmable logic controller has several different ways to control the program and the way in which your program executes. Sequence control, Subroutines, and Step instructions can be used. These are just a few ways in which the controller will execute your logic using a synchronous PLC scan. Understanding the PLC program scan will explain the synchronous and asynchronous program scanning.
Interlocks, Jumps, For Next Loops, Subroutines and Step instructions are some of the ways in which we can control our program in the PLC. We will be looking at some of these instructions in the Omron CP1H PLC. Examples of some of the instructions will be presented. Continue Reading!

Omron CP1H Data Conversion Instructions

Programmable logic controller programming is all about manipulating the bits within the memory of the controller. Sometimes we need to convert from one form to another. This is where we will use data conversion instructions. BCD to Binary, Line to Column, Grey Scale and Multiplexing are just some of the data conversion instructions. We will be looking at some of these instructions in the Omron CP1H PLC. Examples of some of the instructions will be presented. Continue Reading!

Omron CP1H Math Instructions

Programmable logic controllers are not typically known for their math ability. Modern PLC controllers now come with several math instructions to expand the ability to perform math routines. Every controller has different methods to handle math with different numbering systems. Binary, BCD (Binary Coded Decimal) and floating point single and double are examples of some numbering systems. The following is a post on what everybody ought to know about PLC numbering systems. If you subscribe to our website you will get a free copy of the article on numbering systems which includes understanding floating point. You must refer to the programming manual of the controller that you are programming for specific math instruction information.
We will be looking at some of the math instructions in the Omron CP1H PLC. Examples of some of the instructions will be presented. Continue Reading!