Tag Archives: engineering

PLC Learning Series – Program Cyclic Scan


Programmable logic controllers (PLC) use a cyclic scan. The time that it takes to complete one scan is called Scan Time. Typical scan times range from 10 milliseconds to 10 microseconds. This translates from 0.01 to 0.0001 seconds per PLC scan. Understanding how the program scan will help us in programming and troubleshooting the PLC.

The simplest scan cycle of a PLC consists of 4 steps. Read inputs, execute program, diagnostics, and communication, and update outputs.
We will be looking at each of these steps in a little more detail as we discuss the PLC program cyclic scan. Let’s get started. Keep on Reading!

Productivity PLC Simulator – Chain Conveyor MS


The Machine Simulator (MS) is part of the EasyPLC software suite. It has many built-in machines that can be programmed. The chain conveyor is one of these machines. It will transfer large and small boxes on the line to different locations. The productivity series of PLCs will be used to program this virtual machine.
Productivity PLC Simulator - Chain Conveyor MS
Using the Productivity Suite software, we will connect the simulator to the chain conveyor transfer machine. This will be done using Modbus TCP (Ethernet) for communications. Using the five steps for program development we will show how this is programmed. Let’s get started. Keep on Reading!

PLC Learning Series – Understanding Numbers


All programmable logic controllers (PLC) have the same numbering system at their core. This is the same with all computers as well. The status of any memory location can be either on or off. A one (1) will represent an on or “True” status and zero (0) will represent an off or “False” status. This is called binary.

Understanding PLC Numbering Systems
We will be looking at how numbering systems work and some of the common systems that programmable logic controllers use. Let’s get started. Keep on Reading!

PLC Learning Series – Memory Backup


PLC memory is very similar to personal computer memory. There is the operating system and firmware of the processor and connected modules. PLC programs and data that are used by the program are also stored in the memory.
PLC Learning Series – Memory Backup
We will now look at the basic understanding of memory in the PLC. Looking at two examples of PLC specifications. We will see how the program is stored and how long data memory will remain when the PLC is not powered up. Let’s get started. Keep on Reading!

PLC Learning Series – What are Outputs?


PLC outputs are the next component of our PLC block diagram. The outputs of the PLC will be controlled by the PLC program. Controlling outputs is one way to get the inputs to change. We will be looking at digital and analog outputs that can be wired to the programmable logic controller.
PLC Learning Series - What are Outputs?

PLC troubleshooting outputs will also be discussed. This will be done using a multimeter measuring voltage both at the PLC output and across the discrete output load. We will also measure and control an analog signal output. Let’s get started. Keep on Reading!

PLC Learning Series – What are Inputs?


PLC inputs are one component of our PLC block diagram. The output actions of the PLC will be controlled based on the inputs. We will be looking at digital and analog inputs that can be wired to the programmable logic controller.
PLC Learning Series - What are Inputs?
PLC Learning Series - What are Inputs?
We will be looking at wiring of a normally open (NO) push button, normally closed (NC) push button, 3 wire PNP sensor, and an analog sensor to the PLC. These will all be sinking inputs. Let’s get started. Keep on Reading!