Category Archives: AdvancedHMI

AdvancedHMI is written in VB.Net and runs on visual studio. This is a free HMI programming software.

Building a PLC Program That You Can Be Proud Of – Part 5

The Game of Simon
Learning all about bit manipulation and sequencers

Simon is a memory game introduced in 1978. It has four coloured buttons, each producing a particular tone when it is pressed or activated by the device. A round in the game consists of the device lighting up one or more buttons in a random order, after which the player must reproduce that order by pressing the buttons. As the game progresses, the number of buttons to be pressed increases. If the wrong button is hit the current game is over. Our game will have a high-level score and a current level score.


We will be using AdvancedHMI to communicate Modbus TCP to the Automation Direct Do-More Designer Software Simulator.

Watch on YouTube: The Game of Simon Play (PLC / HMI)
Here is the end result of our program.

Note: The programs are provided free of charge and are an excellent way to learn PLC / HMI programming.

Here is a quick review of the programming series so far. If you are new to the site, we recommend reviewing the other parts in the series first. In part 1 we looked at writing PLC programs to control a traffic light using discrete bits and then using timed sequencing using indirect addressing. Part 2 used indirect addressing for inputs as well as output to control the sequence of pneumatic (air) cylinders in the program. Part 3 and 4 we returned to the traffic light application and expand our program significantly. We looked at the sequence of operation using Input, output and mask tables.

Simon Game HMI 130-min

The first thing that we will do is look at the HMI programming. Please refer to the following post for information on setting up and using AdvancedHMI software.
Create a PLC with HMI Training and Learning Environment Free

The following table is the Modbus TCP memory map to the Do-More PLC:

Coil/Register Numbers Data Addresses Type Do-More PLC Table Name
00001-09999 0000 to 270E Read-Write MC1 to MC1023 Discrete Output Coils
10001-19999 0000 to 270E Read-Only MI1 to MI1023 Discrete Input Contacts
30001-39999 0000 to 270E Read-Only MIR1 to MIR2047 Analog Input Registers
40001-49999 0000 to 270E Read-Write MHR1 to MHR2047 Analog Output Holding Registers

Simon Game HMI 100-min
Add the ModbusTCPCom control and set the IP Address. Also, set the PollRateOverride to 50 so the response to our PLC is quicker.

The following map will apply to our game:
(Communication between the HMI and PLC)

40002 – MHR2 – Register – Game Sounds
40001 – MHR1 – Register – Current Game Level
40003 – MHR3 – Register – Highest Game Level
00005 – MC5 – Bit – Start/Reset Game
00001 – MC1 – Bit – Green Button Input
10001 – MI1 – Bit – Green Button Set
00002 – MC1 – Bit – Red Button Input
10002 – MI1 – Bit – Red Button Set
00003 – MC1 – Bit – Yellow Button Input
10003 – MI1 – Bit – Yellow Button Set
00004 – MC1 – Bit – Blue Button Input
10004 – MI1 – Bit – Blue Button Set

Simon Game HMI 110-min
The DataSubsciber is used to read information from the PLC and manipulate the data in the visual basic code.  We will use this to determine what sounds to play.

The following is the code for the button when hit to play the sound and the DataSubscriber1 to play the sound when the playback from the PLC is required. (Console. Beep (Frequency (Hz), Duration (msec)))

Private Sub PilotLight1_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles PilotLight1.Click ‘ Green Light
     Console.Beep(415, 420)
End Sub

Private Sub PilotLight2_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles PilotLight2.Click ‘ Red Light
     Console.Beep(310, 420)
End Sub

Private Sub PilotLight3_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles PilotLight3.Click ‘ Yellow Light
     Console.Beep(252, 420)
End Sub

Private Sub PilotLight4_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles PilotLight4.Click ‘ Blue Light
     Console.Beep(209, 420)
End Sub

Private Sub DataSubscriber1_DataChanged(sender As Object, e As Drivers.Common.PlcComEventArgs) Handles DataSubscriber1.DataChanged
If DataSubscriber1.Value = “1” Then
     Console.Beep(415, 420) ‘ Green
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “2” Then
     Console.Beep(310, 420) ‘ Red
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “4” Then
     Console.Beep(252, 420) ‘ Yellow
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “8” Then
     Console.Beep(209, 420) ‘ Blue
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “10” Then
     Console.Beep(120, 1500) ‘ Losing Sound
ElseIf DataSubscriber1.Value = “20” Then
     For x = 1 To 8
          Console.Beep(600, 90) ‘ Winning Sound
          Threading.Thread.Sleep(20)
     Next ‘x
End If
End Sub

Simon Game HMI 120-min

We now have our HMI interface complete and can move onto the PLC programming.

Random sequence generator – MHR4
The first four bits of MHR4 will be used to generate the random sequence for each step of the pattern.
The first scan is to set (1) a bit in MHR0. This will also ensure that the rest of the bits in the word are reset (0).
The second rung will shift the bits left in the output word MHR0. This will happen once per scan of the PLC. When bit 04 turns on then bit 00 will then be turned on again. This way we will always have one of the first four bits turned on in the output word. (00, 01, 02 or 03) MHR0 is logically AND with Hex value 000F and the result is placed in MHR4.

Simon Game PLC 100-min



Start the Game
The game will be started n the leading edge of the reset button. (MC5)
All of the registers and pointers are reset to start the game.
1     is moved into the current level – MHR1
100 is moved into the Play Sequence Pointer – V1
100 is moved into the Input Sequence Pointer – V2
100 is moved into the Current Level Pointer – V0
The random sequence MHR5 is moved indirectly into the Current Level Pointer V0 and this pointer is then incremented by 1.
An initialization bit is then set.

Simon Game PLC 110-min

The initialization bit starts a timer for 600msec in order to give time for the HMI to respond. Once the time expires the Initialization bit is reset and the game start bit is set. (Y0)
Y0 – Game Started is used to determine if the play is to continue.

Simon Game PLC 120-min

Play the Sequence

Simon Game PLC 130-min

Set the outputs to play the sequence.
This will also set the sound to play for each of the colours selected. (MHR2)

Simon Game PLC 140-min

Reset the sound during the playing of the sequence.

Simon Game PLC 150-min

Read the inputs from the HMI. (MC1 – MC4)
Set the bits in V501 so we can compare the word.

Simon Game PLC 160-min

If the wrong button is hit, then play a sound and stop the game.

Simon Game PLC 170-min

If the correct color is selected, increment to the next random colour in the sequence.

Simon Game PLC 180-min

If the correct colour sequence has been entered, then the level has been completed.
Start a delay to ensure that the HMI has finished playing all of the sounds.

Simon Game PLC 190-min

When the level is entered correctly and the time delay has expired, we will reset the play and input pointers. The level increases by 1 and another random number are added to the sequence and the current level pointer is incremented by 1.
MHR1 – Level – Increases
V1 – 100
V2 – 100
V0 – New random number gets indirectly addressed and the pointer is incremented by 1

Simon Game PLC 200-min

Setting the Highest Level achieved
If the current level is greater than the highest level, the current level is moved to the highest level.

Simon Game PLC 210-min

If no key is hit for 45 seconds after the sequence is played a sound will be played and the game start bit will be reset.

Simon Game PLC 220-min

If the game start bit is off for more than 500ms, the sound will be reset.

Simon Game PLC 230-min

Download the PLC program and the Bin directory for the AdvancedHMI screen.

Watch on YouTube: Building a PLC Program that You can be Proud Of – Part 5 – Game of Simon

Part 6 will look at a sequencer controlling seven cylinders that can be taught. The cylinders can be operator programmed from the AdvancedHMI screen.

If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.




Create a PLC with HMI Training and Learning Environment Free

Learn PLC programming and use a powerful HMI (Human Machine Interface) easily and free. We will use the Automation Direct Do-More programming software tied into the Advanced HMI package via Modbus TCP.
PLC HMI Training Learning 0080-min




Our application will show an HMI screen with a panel meter and a reset button. The panel meter value may be changed by clicking it. This will bring up an input screen to put in a number. When the reset button is selected the input value entered will show on the panel meter.
PLC HMI Training Learning 0310-min

Since we will be communicating via Modbus TCP, the following table shows the Coil/Register Numbers and the associated Do-More PLC Addresses.

Coil/Register Numbers Data Addresses Type Do-More PLC Table Name
00001-09999 0000 to 270E Read-Write MC1 to MC1023 Discrete Output Coils
10001-19999 0000 to 270E Read-Only MI1 to MI1023 Discrete Input Contacts
30001-39999 0000 to 270E Read-Only MIR1 to MIR2047 Analog Input Registers
40001-49999 0000 to 270E Read-Write MHR1 to MHR2047 Analog Output Holding Registers

Note: The Do More PLC uses the Modbus area to communicate. This is because having direct access to the digital I/O can be dangerous when connected via Ethernet to the internet. Data must move in and out of this area via the PLC program.

We will first start with the PLC.
Automation Direct has a powerful simulator with their Do-More PLC. It is the Do-More Designer Software. This software simulator includes the entire instruction set (Not Just Bit Logic) as well as communication protocols. It can be downloaded and installed for free from the above link.
Our PLC program will have the following addresses:
Digital Panel Meter Present Value (PV) – MHR1 – Modbus 40001
Digital Panel Meter Set Value (SV) – MHR2 – Modbus 40002
Reset Button – MC1 – Modbus 00001

The first rung of the ladder will use the 1-second pulse bit and increment the PV value of our digital panel meter. This will also compare the current value to 4000 and if greater or equal, move the value of zero into the PV value.

The second rung of the ladder will move WX0 analog value from our simulator into the PV value of our digital panel meter.

The last rung of ladder will move the SV value into the PV value of our Digital Panel Meter. This happens when the reset is hit.

PLC HMI Training Learning 0200-min

The simulator is showing X0 on and we can then use the WX0 slider to change the PV value of the Panel Meter.
PLC HMI Training Learning 0210-min

Advanced HMI is a powerful HMI/SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) development package that takes advantage of Visual Studio. There is no coding required and you can simply drag and drop items onto the page. The best thing is that the software is free.

Communications drivers include the following and are accessible via VB or C# code:

  • Allen Bradley DF1 RS232 Driver
  • Allen Bradley Ethernet/IP Driver for SLC,MicroLogix, ControlLogix, and CompactLogix
  • Beckhoff TwinCAT Driver
  • Modbus TCP Driver
  • Modbus RTU Driver
  • Omron Ethernet FINS Driver – Ethernet for newer controllers such as CP1H with Ethernet module
  • Omron Serial FINS Driver – Serial (RS232 / RS485) for newer controller such as CP1H
  • Omron Serial HostLink Driver – Serial (RS232 / RS485) for controllers such as CQM1, C200H, K-Series (C28K), C200, etc

The power of Advanced HMI is that it works within Visual Studio. This is a program integrated development environment (IDE) that you can take advantage of to modify or create new features including data logging applications.

Advanced HMI runs on Visual Studio 2008 or higher and will need to be installed on your PC. Visual Studio Community Edition 2015 is the latest version of the software. If you do not have it installed, please download and install from the following link.

https://www.visualstudio.com/en-us/products/visual-studio-community-vsPLC HMI Training Learning 0090-min

We will now need the Advanced HMI project. Here is the link to download the zip file.

http://sourceforge.net/projects/advancedhmi/PLC HMI Training Learning 0095-min

After downloading ‘AdvancedHMIBetaV399a.zip’ extract the files from the zip file. (Right Click.. Select Extract All)
Note: Your version might be different than the one above.

Open the solution file (AdvancedHMIv35.sln) from the extracted files in the root directory.
PLC HMI Training Learning 0097-min

PLC HMI Training Learning 0100-min

Our initial screen looks like the following. The project will now need to be compiled in order to add the components to the Toolbox.
Select Build | Build Solution from the menu
The next thing to do is add the communication to the form. On the left-hand side of the screen, you will see the ‘Toolbox’. Click on it and under AdvancedHMIDrivers Components we will select ModbusTCPCom. To actually add a component to our form you need to drag it. Select the component and as you hold the mouse button down move to the form.PLC HMI Training Learning 0120-min



After adding the ModbusTCPCom component, it will appear at the bottom, beneath our form.
Click on the ModbusTCPCom1 at the bottom of our form. On the right-hand side, you will notice the properties for this communication driver. Under Communication Settings | IP Address, enter the value of the IP Address for the PLC. (192.168.1.3) Ensure that the port number is 502. This is the default port number for Modbus TCP.PLC HMI Training Learning 0130-min

We can now add the digital panel meter. From the toolbox select and drag the DigitalPanelMeter to our form.PLC HMI Training Learning 0140-min

Resize the panel meter on the form by dragging a corner of the component.
While the panel meter is clicked, set the Properties | PLC Properties of the component:
PLCAddressValue – 40001 – MHR1 – Value to display on the meter.
PLCAddressKeypad – 40002 – MHR2 – This is the location of the stored number when the operator selects the meter and enters a number in the keypad.PLC HMI Training Learning 0150-min

Add a MomentaryButton to our form by selecting and dragging it from the toolbox.PLC HMI Training Learning 0160-min

After re-sizing the component, we can change the colour to blue under Properties | Misc. Also, change the text on the button to ‘RESET’
Set the PLCAddressClick value to 00001. This is address MC1 in the Do-More PLC.PLC HMI Training Learning 0170-min

Run the application by selecting the ‘Start’ form the top menu. This also can be started by hitting ‘F5’. The form will then show in a separate window and the panel meter will be incrementing the value. Hitting the reset button will reset the value to the one entered when you click the panel meter.PLC HMI Training Learning 0310-min

When you hit the panel meter on the display a keypad will then pop up on your screen. Enter the new value and then select ‘Enter’. The new value will appear in MHR2 in the Do-More PLC.
PLC HMI Training Learning 0320-min

Watch on YouTube: Create a PLC with HMI Training and Learning Environment Free
If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.




How you can learn PLC Programming without spending a dime!

I have been writing PLC programs for over 20 years. I often get asked what is the best way to learn PLC programming. Programming in the way I was taught in college was with the Motorola 6809. (Yes, I know that I am dating myself) This was microprocessor programming, but it was the best way to sometimes explain the methods behind PLC programming. Manufacturers of PLCs had proprietary software that was not even related in their appearance and methods of programming. Today we have a few standards that have changed the look and feel of the programming software packages so each manufacturer is similar. The following is the best recommendation that I have for beginners to start to learn PLC programming today.


start stop 003

The first place to start in order to learn PLC programming is free publication by Kevin Collins. This PDF will teach you PLC programming without just telling you what a PLC is and how it functions. He also includes some test questions along the way in order for you to retain and understand the important points that he is making.

PLC Programming for Industrial Automation
by Kevin Collins
(Note: This book is now for sale on Amazon.)

Topics covered include:

  • PLC Basics
  • Ladder Programming
  • Conditional Logic
  • Ladder Diagrams
  • Normally closed contacts
  • Outputs and latches
  • Internal relays
  • Timers
  • The Pulse Generator
  • Counters
  • Sequential Programming Introduction
  • Evolution of the Sequential Function Chart
  • Programming using the Sequential Function Chart
  • Entering the SFC program into the PLC
  • Modifying an SFC Program
  • Selective Branching
  • Parallel Branching

GreyToBinaryCode

Simulator

After learning the basics from the above manual, practice. Create programs yourself and test what you have learned. You can accomplish this by using simulators. Allot of the programming software will have simulators. The simulator will mimic the PLC hardware so you can test your programs before installing in the field. Traditionally I have not been a fan of simulators, but recently Automation Direct has introduced a simulator with their Do-More PLC. It is the Do-More Designer Software. This software simulator includes the entire instruction set (Not Just a Bit Logic) as well as communication protocols. It can be downloaded and installed for free from the above link.

Indirect Addressing 2 Pointer

The next step I recommend is then to advance into some of the advanced instructions. An understanding of the numbering systems in the PLC will be a benefit. Math, PID, register manipulation and conversion instructions are just a few of the advanced programming you can learn. All of these and more instruction information can be obtained from reviewing the documentation from the PLC manual that you are programming. Once again all of these instructions are included in the Do-More Designer Software.

Indirect Addressing Animation

The program structure is the next topic. Allot of programmers would stop here and can do well with developing software, however, there is much more than you can lean.  Sequencers give programmers the methods to change the logic on the fly and allow troubleshooting the system easier. This method of programming can benefit you greatly and reduce the development time of your logic.

Omron HostLink Frame_Responseadu_pdu

The last step that I recommend learning is the sharing of information. I am meaning the information that you program through an HMI and/or SCADA package. This refers to the understanding of the ways in which information can be gathered from the PLC and displayed in different ways. Here are a couple of previous articles that have been written on this subject:

How to Implement the Omron PLC Host Link Protocol 

Robust PLC Data Logger

iis107 display

As you can see, there is a lot of information available to you to begin and lean PLC programming without spending a dime!  Remember that PLCs are similar to computers, (Moore’s Law) they increase in size and ability. Systems are expanding and changing every day. Happy programming.

Do you know of additional tips or methods to share?
PLC Beginner’ s Guide – There are many different PLC manufacturers with different hardware and software. All of the programmable logic controllers have similar basic features. Here is how I would approach learning about basic PLCs.

Watch on YouTube: How you can learn PLC Programming without spending a dime!

If you have any questions or need further information please contact me.
Thank you,
Garry



If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.




Changing Landscape of PLC Programming

Today’s new processing and networking power the future looks bright for programmable logic controllers and it’s programming. This has allowed the role of the PLC to expand.




System Design:

PLC design has changed significantly. Computer processing power has now added the following to programmable controllers:

  • Micro USB slots (Data Storage)
  • Ethernet ports
  • WiFi
  • RS232 / RS422 / RS485 (Serial Ports)
  • Canbus
  • Profibus
  • DeviceNet
  • Several digital I/O bus systems like ASi Bus

System design more than ever is done by asking even more question on what is required when installing a PLC system.

Traditional Questions to Ask:
  • The number of input signals? Voltage levels? (Discrete on/off inputs.)
  • The number of output signals? Voltage levels? (Discrete on/off outputs.)
  • The number of analog input signals? Voltage and/or Current levels?
  • The number of analog output signals? Voltage and/or Current levels?
  • Operator Interface required? HMI – Human Machine Interface – This is now a touch or function key LCD or LED screen.
  • Etc.

Additional Questions to Ask:

  • Drives / Motors  – What are you connecting to and the communication system required?
  • Computer network – Will this join your computer network? What is the connection cable and communication protocol?
  • Do you need data collection?
    • Do you need data displayed and/or controlled on a remote device such as a tablet or phone?
  • Do you need email and/or text messages sent out by the PLC?
  • Etc.

Programming:

PLC
There has been a movement to standardize PLC programming. IEC 61131-3 is the standard for PLC programming. It defines three programming methods:
  1. Ladder Diagram – Graphical structure
  2. Function Block Diagram – Graphical structure
  3. Structured Text – Textual structure
  4. Instruction List – Textual structure
  5. Sequential Function Chart – Graphical and Textual structure
The above methods to program PLC’s all will do a good job. It depends on how you were originally taught about programming and the experience that you have. Not all PLC’s will be able to program in the 5 different ways. Some will only provide a couple. You will have to see the programming manual of the make and model of the PLC that you want to program.
IEC 61131-3 is good, however, this does not mean that every programmable controller will program the same way. It will look familiar between the programming ladder in AB vs Siemens vs Omron vs Direct Automation, but the keystrokes in the software will be different. Manufactures, in my opinion, will not come to an agreement to have the software exactly the same for all PLC programming. Why should they take away from their market share?
HMI – Human Machine Interface

Just about every manufacturer’s HMI screen will be programmed with different software. Due to the proprietary nature of communications, I would always use the manufacturers HMI with their PLC. The communications are usually direct to the memory areas, and faster response time.

Computer
I believe it is always best to have some computer background information. All of our lives are based upon desktop, laptop, tablets, and smartphones. Each of these will have an operating system like Windows, iOS, Android, etc.
Higher level languages such as Visual Basic (VB6) will give you the ability to run self-contained programs that can install on a computer and communicate to the network. I have used this to retrieve information out of the PLC’s on the production floor and save this information into a database.

The computer languages are not always the easiest to learn, but with the tutorials and information on the web, this becomes easier. Once you learn one language well, then this will create a building block of knowledge for you to understand even more.
Microsoft Visual Studio is a free download and fully functional computer environment. This will include the latest visual basic product.


Computer Network
The ability to share information in the company is important. You cannot find a manufacturing plant without a computer network. This is usually confined to the ‘front office’ and is for email, engineering, and accounting. We need to get the information from the plant floor to everyone on the Intranet and/or Internet. This can be done by setting up a web server and using basic HTML and ASP to deliver real-time data to the network from the PLC.
http://www.w3schools.com/
W3school help me to deliver real-time data via email and web pages to the computer network.
HTML stands for hypertext markup language and is used for all web pages.
ASP stands for active server pages and is used to communicate from a database to web pages.
HTML, ASP, Javascript, VBScript, etc are all languages that are used to define the information that gets shared on a computer network through a web server via a web client.

We have an abundance of information and ways to learn programming. The language and way will change depending on what you want to do. PLC programming is not just the logic behind discrete input and outputs on a machine, it is the entire system. It is the sharing and use of information for the organization.
I believe that we are going and growing in the right direction with information sharing…

How do you see this change?
Let me know.
Garry




If you’re like most of my readers, you’re committed to learning about technology. Numbering systems used in PLC’s are not difficult to learn and understand. We will walk through the numbering systems used in PLCs. This includes Bits, Decimal, Hexadecimal, ASCII and Floating Point.

To get this free article, subscribe to my free email newsletter.


Use the information to inform other people how numbering systems work. Sign up now.

The ‘Robust Data Logging for Free’ eBook is also available as a free download. The link is included when you subscribe to ACC Automation.